Scouting Report: Furkan Korkmaz

Furkan Korkmaz is a shooting guard/small forward from Anadolu Efes Istanbul. Korkmaz is 6’7. For the year, he averaged, 8.8 minutes per game, 2.7 points per game, 0.9 rebounds per game, 0.5 assists per game, while shooting 39.1% from the field, and 42.3% from three.

Pros:

  • Athleticism
  • Gym rat
  • Desired NBA wing size
  • High basketball IQ
  • Team leader
  • Great all-around scorer
  • Excellent shooting mechanics
  • Three point specialist
  • Attacks the rim
  • Excellent in transition
  • Can play above the rim
  • Good ball handler
  • Great court vision
  • Unselfish on offense
  • Continues to improve as an offensive piece

Cons:

  • Strength
  • Poor defensive player
  • Offensive consistency
  • Clutch factor
  • Inability to see the court

Overall:

The game of basketball continues to grow in talent overseas, and Furkan Korkmaz is the next name fans should begin to remember. He is one of the youngest players in the draft class, and therefore did not see the court a lot in Turkey, but that does hold him back. His stats were not eye-popping for Istanbul, but what he was able to do during youth tournaments have scouts and general managers drooling.

On offense, Korkmaz is a natural-born scorer, fully capable of putting the team on his back. I watched film on him over the past three years, and he has shown incredible growth, and continues to add new dimensions to his offensive game. Korkmaz draws a lot of attention for his three point shooting ability, but this is not all he offers. His mid-range jumper is also deadly, and his form on it is near perfect for a 18-year-old. Korkmaz has really developed his ability to attack the rim, thanks in large part to his growth in seeing the court, and how to exploit the defense. Korkmaz uses his speed and agility to blow by defenders, and if he knows he will not make it to the rack, he will kick out to his teammate for a great scoring chance. His leaping ability will help Korkmaz get those highlight reel dunks love to watch. Korkmaz has very good handles for a shooting guard, better than some of the point guards in the class. His ability to penetrate without committing a lot of turnovers is another plus for the young man. Thanks in large part to his court vision and high basketball IQ, you can expect to see Korkmaz’s assist numbers skyrocket once he is in the league.

Defense is a huge hole in Korkmaz’s game. His lack of strength causes the biggest problem. On the perimeter, Korkmaz has the ability to stay in front of his man, and contest many of their shots. He also has very quick hands to force steals, which he can use to be a deadly scorer in transition. His problem is when they drive, and try to post him up. They can push him around at will, and this will lead to foul trouble in the modern NBA. Korkmaz is in the gym a lot to improve his shot, so getting him in the weight room should not be a problem, and he has the frame to add the needed weight to not get bullied around. Korkmaz is very fundamental when it comes to rebounding, but this is not a noteworthy skill he possesses. He will be average at the next level in terms of rebounding.

As an overall, Korkmaz is going to be a tremendous offensive addition for whatever team decides to select him, but for now he is a black hole on defense. I do not expect Korkmaz to contribute much right away as he finds his consistency and role within the team, but once he has been given the green light, expect Korkmaz to light it up. Korkmaz should see his draft range in the 10-16 range, with the Chicago Bulls most likely to select his services. The Bulls need to add another wing capable of scoring at a high rate, as Tony Snell has failed to live up to the hype around him early on. With Butler being the shutdown perimeter defense, Chicago is able to cover up the liability of Kormaz’s defenses a little better than most teams can.

Pro Comparison: Evan Fournier

Evan Fournier is about to get paid this offseason, as he becomes a restricted free agent. Korkmaz shows almost the exact same characteristics of Fournier, so many teams planning to try to poach Fournier away from the Orlando Magic, could look for the cheaper, younger version in Korkmaz.

Offensively, both players are gifted scorers from anywhere on the court. Both players have smooth strokes on their jumper, with high conversion rates from deep. Fournier and Korkmaz are also very good at attacking the rim. Neither play is very explosive when finishing at the rim, but are capable finishers. Korkmaz is a much better passer than Fournier was coming over from Europe. The bad for both players coming over from Europe was offensive confidence, but as we saw from Fournier this season, this will come with time in the league.

Defensively, both players are not good defensive players. Fournier has the edge on strength, and therefore is the better of the two on defense. He uses his wingspan, athleticism, and strength to slow down his opponent on the wing, while he does not get pushes around as much as Korkmaz does now, and likely would at the NBA level. Both players have quick hands, which leads to steals, and easy points in transition. As mentioned with Korkmaz above, he is not an elite rebounder, and neither is Fournier, both players are willing rebounders, but not a game changer asset.

Korkmaz is so young, and with so much continue growth on his offensive game, it is hard to predict his potential. If he can come overseas with some confidence in himself, he could start off very hot in the league. However, if he comes over timid, we might have to wait for a season or two to see the full potential from him. Hopefully with better coaches, Korkmaz can improve his defensive abilities, as this will hold him back from a starting role early on.

By: Mac Crowe, @Mac_Truck17

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